Mark Russinovich and Aaron Margosis Provide Reference for SysInternals!

About Show #227

Richard talks to Mark Russinovich and Aaron Margosis about the newly released Sysinternals Administrator's Reference. SysInternals is a vital part of any IT administrator's toolkit, but has never been well documented. The administrator's reference is that documentation, including details on every SysInternals tool as well as troubleshooting examples and a detailed overview of core Windows concepts. If you're using SysInternals (and who isn't), you need this book!
 

Mark Russinovich is a Technical Fellow in the Windows Azure group at Microsoft. He is a widely recognized expert in Windows operating system internals as well as operating system architecture and design. He is co-author of the Windows Internals book series, the official Microsoft Press book on Windows operating system internals. Russinovich joined Microsoft in 2006 when Microsoft acquired Winternals Software, the company he cofounded in 1996, as well as Sysinternals, where he authors and publishes dozens of popular Windows administration and diagnostic utilities including Autoruns, Process Explorer and Tcpview. He is a featured speaker at major industry conferences including Microsoft's TechEd, WinHEC, and Professional Developers Conference.

Aaron Margosis is a Principal Consultant with Microsoft Public Sector Services where he has worked primarily with U.S. Federal government customers since 1999. He specializes in application development on Microsoft platforms with an emphasis on security and application compatibility in locked-down environments, and is a highly-regarded speaker at Microsoft conferences. He is well known for having evangelized running Windows XP as a non-admin and for publishing utilities and guidance to make doing so more feasible. His MakeMeAdmin script pioneered the concept of a single user account running in both administrative and non-admin contexts, influencing the design of User Account Control. Aaron's several security utilities can be downloaded through his blog (http://blogs.msdn.com/aaron_margosis) and his team's blog (http://blogs.technet.com/fdcc).
 

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